Viewing entries tagged
creative process

Comment

Watchlist To Receive Public Reading

Save the date: Thursday, June 13th at 8pm

Hatchlings.jpg

After several months of additional development, Watchlist will be presented in a public reading as part of the Hatchlings reading series at Bluebird in Brooklyn. Hatchlings presents new works and old for free on the second Thursday of every month, a great opportunity to bring more art to the Prospect-Lefferts Gardens neighborhood. More information is available here, and updates about my reading will be coming soon! Hope to see you there!

Comment

Comment

Watchlist is in Development

 
IMG_3387.JPG
 

After working solo on this play intermittently for several years, Watchlist, formerly titled Scars Over Berlin, is finally being produced in 2019. Watchlist is starting its developmental process tonight with the first of a series of table reads with actors so I may get a sense of where the play currently sits and what still needs work. After some initial edits, Watchlist heads to a quick workshop process in the spring, followed by a full production in summer 2019. I am looking forward to working with some of the actors who performed Park Place this summer and fall, and owe a great debt of gratitude to all the actors participating in this unglamorous but crucial step in the playwriting process.

For more information about Watchlist, click here!

A remaining piece of the Berlin Wall, photographed in 2015.

A remaining piece of the Berlin Wall, photographed in 2015.

Comment

Forever Ravenclaw

I've mentioned before that as an actor and a theatre artist I consider myself to be a perpetual student. Really, as a person, I have always been an academic; I didn't need a sorting hat quiz on Pottermore to tell me I'm a Ravenclaw. But particularly in the arts there is always more to learn about the craft, more films to watch and actors to study and theory books to read, even if actual classes may be financially out of reach. The Summer Sling reinvigorated my love of the atmosphere of study, and in the two weeks since I have filled my free time watching fight films, rereading old books on acting and audition techniques, seeking out new plays, and submitting myself for various acting/company membership/fight director opportunities. 

Four days of constant critical thinking about what makes effective fight choreography made me realize how passive I had become with my craft, even while I was auditioning and performing. Not that I didn't put work into the projects of which I was a part, but just that I was not doing everything I could to enrich myself as a theatre maker in the in-between times (and let's face it, there are a lot of long in-between times). Perhaps what I am finally grappling with is the melding of career and craft, recognizing that they are two distinct but inseparable aspects of the life of an artist.

College was four years of honing my craft, gathering as many tools as possible to make myself a better actor/designer/collaborator etc. It was a time to learn as much as I could about what is available to learn, and to be constantly hungry for more knowledge, more skills, more experience. I believe I used my four years at NYU well, taking on perhaps too many projects in my quest for opportunities and challenges.

The first couple years after graduation were, in large part, focused not even on career but simply on financial stability. Goal number one was work enough, earn enough money at whatever day job, to be able to stay in this city to keep making theatre. It has only truly been in the last year or so that I have started to have time to actually focus on my career, creating this website and a backstage profile to really be able to put myself "out there" for auditions and to be able to promote my work as a playwright and fighter.

The shift in focus, after school, to the business of being a theatre artist, resulted in an absence of time spent reading new plays or books about craft. It is thrilling, now, therefore, to be able to return to my true love, the study of artistry and the creation of the artistry itself. Earlier this week marked my eight year anniversary of moving to this city I love to do what I love, and I want so much more but I'm so grateful for where I've gotten.

Here's my Ravenclaw wisdom for you: 

 
Happiness is having something that satisfies you while also having something for which to strive.
 
Photo by Theik Smith Photography at the 2016 New York Summer Sling.

Photo by Theik Smith Photography at the 2016 New York Summer Sling.